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  1. Books 3 items
    Your reading throughout the course will not be restricted to one textbook, and will often be composed of materials not present in any prescribed text. As such we do not recommend any one book for purchase for the course but provide references and hyperlinks to material needed. In addition to the listings below other links may be accessible via the course content page on blackboard and seminar materials. The teaching team are happy to suggest books on specific topics within the library for any students who wish to read further into areas we cover or those who are considering dissertations in the field.
    1.  

      Observations / Recommendations

       

      A number of students have now asked me if I would recommend any textbooks for the course. As I pointed out in my first lecture, no textbook is necessary for the course and there is no need to buy one. However I accept that some students will want to use one as a basis for their study and revision for the exams in January.

       

      With that in mind below are links to two textbooks. Both cover most but not all aspects of the course. 

    2. International Human Rights Law - Rhona Smith 07/12/2017

      Book  The more basic of these two texts. An undergraduate text, but which is very clear and easily followed

    3. International human rights law and practice - Ilias Bantekas, Lutz Oette 2016

      Book  A more advanced, larger and more expensive undergraduate/postgraduate text. Worth investing in if you are an undergraduate thinking of further study in this area but also if you want a textbook for this course.

  2. Periodical Literature / Journals 4 items
    There are also a number of journals that track new developments in the subject and are a source of scholarly treatment of issues. Many journals can be accessed in full text form via the Westlaw and Lexis electronic service that the University library subscribes to. Many journals with a broad focus (e.g. Legal Studies, Modern Law Review, Law Quarterly Review, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, The Cambridge Law Journal etc.) will contain human rights focused pieces at times due to the pervasive nature of the topic. However, a selection of dedicated journals for the purpose of keeping abreast of developments in the field and to use in completing coursework (UG students only), which are available electronically via the library are:
    1. Human Rights Law Review - University of Nottingham. Human Rights Law Centre 2001-

      Journal 

  3. Seminar 1: Introduction to Human Rights and International Human Rights 7 items
    Note that students are not expected to ‘read everything’ but to come prepared to answer the questions set and contribute to debate in the seminar. In particular with this seminar there is a focus on understanding key concepts, debates and challenges surrounding human rights as an introduction to the course and NOT on considering every point which might be made in response to each question
    1. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - Stanford University, Center for the Study of Language and Information (U.S.) ©1997-

      Journal  A highly useful database of philosophical concepts and debates. Easily navigated using the search function, these pages are the best source in relation to Question 2

    2. Unesco Courier

      Document  Karel Vasak's original piece proposing a third generation of rights, 'A 30 Year Struggle,' is to be found on Page 29

    3. Core Human Rights texts to consider in relation to Questions 1 and 4: 4 items
  4. Seminar 2: International and Regional Human Rights 9 items
    Note that students are not expected to ‘read everything’ but to come prepared to answer the questions set and contribute to debate in the seminar. In particular with this seminar there is a focus on understanding key concepts, debates and challenges surrounding human rights as an introduction to the course and NOT on considering every point which might be made in response to each question
  5. Seminar 3: Comparative and Regional Human Rights Systems (Africa and the Americas) 8 items
    Note that students are not expected to ‘read everything’ but to come prepared to answer the questions set and contribute to debate in the seminar. In particular with this seminar there is a focus on understanding key concepts, debates and challenges surrounding human rights as an introduction to the course and NOT on considering every point which might be made in response to each question
    1. Neither Dualism nor Monism: Holism and the Relationship between Municipal and International Human Rights Law - Thomas Finegan 12/2011

      Article  Students need not concern themselves overly with the theory of 'holism' as this is not covered in the course, but this piece is useful to illustrate the flaws of monistic and dualistic approaches

  6. Seminar 4: Children’s Rights and Economic Social and Cultural Rights 6 items
    Note that students are not expected to ‘read everything’ but to come prepared to answer the questions set and contribute to debate in the seminar. Students are also encouraged to go beyond the reading listed here in support of their answers, using both lecture slides and their own research
    1. International family law

      Journal  See Parkes, A. 'The Right of the Child to be Heard in Family Law Proceedings: Article 12 UNCRC' [2009] International Family Law 238

    2. Coventry Law Journal

      Journal  Available via Westlaw. See Gingell, B. 'Children's Rights are Human Rights: Liability of the state for damage caused to children in the course of child protection work' (2001) 6 Coventry Law Journal 78

  7. Seminar 5: Freedom of Expression, Right to Life and the Prohibition of Torture 6 items
    Note that students are not expected to ‘read everything’ but to come prepared to answer the questions set and contribute to debate in the seminar. Students are also encouraged to go beyond the reading listed here in support of their answers, using both lecture slides and their own research
    1. Constitutional & administrative law - Hilaire Barnett 2017

      Book  Read Chapter 19: 'Freedom of Expression and Privacy'

    2. European Convention on Human Rights: commentary - Christoph Grabenwarter 2014

      Book  Read Article 10 – Freedom of Expression 251-296

    3. Unlocking Human Rights - Peter Halstead 2014

      Book  Available via eBook Central. Read Chapter 8: 'Freedom of Expression'

  8. Undergraduate Coursework 2018-19 16 items
    Note that this is by no means an exclusive list, and the seminar and lecture readings as well as your own research should also be used in constructing your answer to the coursework questions. All markers will also be given this list and so will be able to assess the extent of your own research. All sources are available via the library or hyperlinks provided. Please ensure you reference all work which is not your own and ideas which you have paraphrased to avoid any suggestions of malpractice.
    1. Question 1: 8 items
      1. Out of the Abyss: The Challenges Confronting the New U. N. Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights - Phillip Alston 08/1987

        Article  An old piece but containing points which are still relevant.

    2. Question 2: 8 items
      1.  

        Office For The High Commissioner Of Human Rights: The Major Regional Human Rights Instruments And The Mechanisms For Their Implementation. https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/training9chapter3en.pdf

         

      2. Human Rights in the Administration of Justice: A Manual on Human Rights for Judges, Prosecutors and Lawyers 2002

        Webpage  Available to download via the International Bar Association website. Read Chapter 3:

      3. Comparative regional human rights regimes: Defining a research agenda - Başak Çalı, Mikael Rask Madsen, Frans Viljoen 12/05/2018

        Article 

  9.  

    LAWS30091

     

    Useful Reading List

     

    Undergraduate Coursework 2018-19

     

     

     

    Note that this is by no means an exclusive list, and the seminar and lecture readings as well as your own research should also be used in constructing your answer to the coursework questions. All markers will also be given this list and so will be able to assess the extent of your own research. All sources are available via the library or hyperlinks provided. Please ensure you reference all work which is not your own and ideas which you have paraphrased to avoid any suggestions of malpractice.

     

     

     

    Question 1:

     

    Oberleitner, G. (2018). International Human Rights Institutions, Tribunals, and Courts . Singapore: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-5206-4

     

    Nowak, M. (2013). Comments on the UN High Commissioner's Proposals Aimed at Strengthening the UN Human Rights Treaty Body System. Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights31(1), 3–8. https://doi.org/10.1177/016934411303100101

     

    Alston, P. (1987). Out of the Abyss: The Challenges Confronting the New UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Human Rights Quarterly9(3), 332–381. https://doi.org/10.2307/761879 – NOTE: an old piece but containing points made which are still relevant.

     

    Boerfijn, I. (1995). "Towards a Strong System of Supervision": The Human Rights Committee's Role in Reforming the Reporting Procedure under Article 40 of the Covenant "on Civil and Political Rights." Human Rights Quarterly17(4), 766–793. https://doi.org/10.1353/hrq.1995.0035

     

    Carraro, V. (2017). The United Nations Treaty Bodies and Universal Periodic Review: Advancing Human Rights by Preventing Politicization? Human Rights Quarterly39(4), 943–970. https://doi.org/10.1353/hrq.2017.0055

     

    Arp, B. (2009). Lessons Learned from Spain's Practice before the United Nations Human Rights Reporting Mechanisms: Treaty Bodies and Universal Periodic Review. Spanish Yearbook of International Law Online15(1), 1–37. https://doi.org/10.1163/22116125-91000031

     

    Schmid, E. (2013). Socio-Economic and Cultural Rights and Wrongs after Armed Conflicts: Using the State Reporting Procedure before the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights More Effectively. Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights31(3), 241–270. https://doi.org/10.1177/016934411303100303

     

    Gomez Del Prado, J., & Gomez del Prado, J. (1985). United Nations conventions on human rights: the practice of the Human Rights Committee and the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, in dealing with reporting obligations of states parties. Human Rights Quarterly7, 492–513. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/59398927/

     

     

     

    Question 2:

     

    Huneeus, A., & Madsen, M. (2018). Between universalism and regional law and politics: A comparative history of the American, European, and African human rights systems. International Journal of Constitutional Law16(1), 136–160. https://doi.org/10.1093/icon/moy011

     

    Mubiala, M. (1997). Contribution to the comparative study of African, American and European regional mechanisms for the protection of human rights. African journal of international and comparative law9(1), 42–54. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/839054088/

     

    Hampson, F., Martin, C., & Viljoen, F. (2018). Inaccessible apexes: Comparing access to regional human rights courts and commissions in Europe, the Americas, and Africa. International Journal of Constitutional Law16(1). Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/2054180113/

     

    Heyns, C., Strasser, W., & Padilla, D. (2003). A schematic comparison of regional human rights systems. African Human Rights Law Journal3(1), 76–87. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/36539376/

     

    Heyns, C., Padilla, D., Zwaak, L., & Heyns, C. (2006). A Schematic Comparison Of Regional Human Rights Systems: An Update. Sur - International Journal of Human Rights3(4), 163–176. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/61705862/

     

    Howard, R. (1984). Evaluating Human Rights in Africa: Some Problems of Implicit Comparisons. Human Rights Quarterly6(2), 160–179. https://doi.org/10.2307/762241

     

    Office For The High Commissioner Of Human Rights: The Major Regional Human Rights Instruments And The Mechanisms For Their Implementation. https://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/training9chapter3en.pdf

     

    Çalı, B., Madsen, M., & Viljoen, F. (2018). Comparative regional human rights regimes: Defining a research agenda. International Journal of Constitutional Law16(1), 128–135. https://doi.org/10.1093/icon/moy008